What Are The Most Common Summer Skin Problems And How Can You Treat Them?

The dog days of summer are approaching and everyone can’t wait to get outdoors to enjoy the warmer weather. However, as we hit the beaches, go camping, entertain outside, and spend more time in the elements, our skin can suffer.

Here are some of the most common skin problems during the summer, and some tips on how you can beat them!

Skin Problems With The Sun

We love feeling the sun on our skin, but while we are outside everyone knows they should be wearing sunscreen. Nevertheless, there are still people who go in the sun unprotected to defy the odds.  The dangerous UV rays will burn your skin, cause discoloration and more wrinkles, and potentially skin cancer.

Even with sunscreen your skin can still burn if you forget to re-apply it, think you don’t need it on a cloudy day at the beach, or don’t use one with at least SPF 30.

If you do happen to get burned, treat it by applying an OTC corticosteroid cream and taking a shower with cool water to ease the burn. If blisters, fever, or swelling occurs, it’s time to see your dermatologist for professional treatment.

In the future, remember to liberally apply sunscreen, wear a hat, sunglasses and don’t forget the sun safety for the children!

Skin Problems And Gardening

Any gardener “worth his salt” should know how to spot poison ivy, poison oak, or sumac. These plants can wreak havoc with your skin should you touch them or they brush against your skin or clothing. First order of business is to wash your clothes, shower, and wash your hair in warm water, not hot. Treat with a hydrocortisone ointment or allergy medication along with cool compresses after you have done this.

Gardening or just being outside entertaining can make you susceptible to all manners of insects and critters like ants, spiders, and mosquito bites. Scratching only makes it worse, so forgo that approach and treat with ice packs, anti-itch sprays, and a cooling gel.

Skin Problems And Humidity

The humid hot air of summer makes us sweat more and produce oil – leading to breakouts and all kinds of rashes.

woman with healthy skin applying sunscreen to shoulder

  • Treat athlete’s foot with OTC antifungal creams between toes and antifungal powder in your shoes.
  • Wear less makeup during the summer months. The heat causes makeup to melt into pores creating additional oil and precipitating pimples and acne.
  • Wear light weight more breathable clothing  like cotton to reduce sweat and heat rashes.
  • Exercise in the cool hours of the day or in an air-conditioned setting.
  • Contact dermatitis can be a problem during the humid months. See Dr. Goodless if OTC meds are not working.

Skin Problems With Water

Summertime means spending more time in the water. Sometimes hot tubs harbor bacteria to attack our skin, causing the development of folliculitis or hot tub rash. Your dermatologist can provide treatment with oral medications.

It sounds counterintuitive, but the combination of the pool, the sun, and air conditioning can lead to dry skin. To remedy this summertime quirk, shower and wash your hair and face with a mild soap, wear less makeup, and moisturize. Remember to stay hydrated.

We can all enjoy the summer without sacrificing our skin!

Contact Goodless Dermatology for questions or concerns about  skin problems this summer so that you can enjoy it without being worried!

As always, if you have any further questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please call (407) 566-1616 or request an appointment online today!

COVID-19 Update

Goodless Dermatology is closely following the most up-to-date announcements and information on the known cases of Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). Because this information is always changing, we will be monitoring all updates from the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control.

If you are experiencing cold or flu symptoms, please make sure to contact us via phone prior to your appointment. You may also contact us for any additional questions by calling our office at (407) 566-1616

Here are a few additional resources as well:

World Health Organization
Centers for Disease Control

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